Aug 3 2015

Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun

choosing a home defense shotgun Il ling newIt’s been a few years, but shotguns for home defense seem to be making a comeback. It’s not that rifles and handguns won’t work well for home defense, it’s just that shotguns have so much going for them in that realm.

With the array of ammunition available, shotguns can shoot everything from “less-lethal” loads (think rubber bullets, bean bags and others) to snake shot, to buckshot (.30+ caliber projectiles!) to 400-plus grain slugs. While most of us who aren’t in law enforcement or the military will negotiate shorter distances with our defensive shotguns, the scattergun’s versatility does offer the ability to shoot ammo that can address targets at much longer ranges. On the flipside, there is shotgun ammunition that will travel and/or penetrate less, and that might be appropriate for your circumstance. When we add to this the array of accessories also available for them (which isn’t always necessarily a good thing; we’ll touch more on this later), shotguns might be the most versatile home defense firearms you can get.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun.


May 7 2015

How to Properly Fit a Shotgun

how to properly fit a shotgun il ling new

As a shooter and an instructor, nothing pains me more than watching someone get thrown around by his shotgun.  Except, perhaps, being beaten up by my own shotgun.

Why? First, it doesn’t have to happen. Second, it’ll have a negative effect on the shooter’s learning and performance. Third, that just might cause him to walk away from the sport altogether.

The most common reason for this abuse is a poorly fitting shotgun, especially among shooters who are smaller in stature. And by that, I mean pretty much anyone who doesn’t fit the standard or average measurement of a male shooter: approximately 5’10”, 185 pounds. It’s not their fault, and it’s not our fault. Manufacturers have to have some sort of standard to work to–and fortunately for us smaller folk, several are addressing our problem and are creating scaled-down versions of their various firearms.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Properly Fit a Shotgun.


Nov 26 2013

The Bugout Kit

Peabody on Il Ling's Bugout Kit, Ready to Go On The Wild SideSome of you have asked about my bugout gear, so I’ll tell you what MY packs have — everybody’s kit will be different, but should have the basics. Mine weighs more than the recommended “25% of your body weight” — it comes in at just under 50 pounds. But I’ve made sure I can lift, stand, and hike with it if I have to. The cool thing is there is a smaller backpack that zips off the front of the large pack. I’ve loaded what I consider to be the most critical items in it, so I’m still ready if I only have room/energy for the smaller pack. This photo gives you an idea of size: Peabody is a 11 pound mini-dachshund.

(I use ziplocks and/or space saver bags — both to protect stuff, but also to have the bags available.)

This list is NOT in order of importance!

Small (Critical Items) Pack:

  • Water filtration system+steel cup+collapsible water bottle
  • Fire starter+candles
  • Disposable towels
  • Head lamp+ batteries
  • Comprehensive first aid kit ( also includes trauma stuff, rubbing alcohol, saline, dental floss for sutures, etc.)
  • Duct tape, paracord, zip ties
  • Garbage bags
  • STORM whistle
  • Fixed blade knife
  • Multitool
  • Permanent marker
  • Socks
  • Fleece stocking cap
  • Non-battery flashlight
  • Clothes (including waterproof stuff)
  • Saw
  • Neoprene gloves
  • Nitrile gloves (also in first aid kit)
  • Alcohol wipes (also in first aid kit)
  • Orange safety vest
  • Orange surveyor’s tape
  • Orange bandana
  • Survival suit
  • Space blanket
  • Strobing blinker
  • Breathing mask (dust, etc.)
  • Copies of passport, etc.

(Personal defense tools go on my person)

Bugout Gear: In the larger pack (which, again, zips to the smaller)

  • Tent
  • Sleeping bag
  • Extra clothing
  • Quick-dry microfiber towel
  • Permanent marker
  • 5-hour energy
  • Large garbage bags (the dark, thick ones)
  • Water proof pads – can be used together as tarp, or individually to carry, wrap, funnel, etc.
  • Tissues
  • Toothbrush/toothpaste
  • Emergency poncho
  • Baby wipes
  • Additional first aid supplies (to supplement those in small pack)
  • Extra shoes
  • Playing cards (aside from obvious use, can also be used for paper, etc.)

And of course,
Peabody’s Pack — which goes into a dog carrier, just in case we need that for transport, etc. (ditto the muzzle):

  • Food
  • Stainless food and water bowls
  • First aid kit (I put it together just for dog stuff)
  • Extra copies of rabies, etc.
  • Extra leash
  • Extra collars, including lighted collar
  • Extra harness
  • Blinker (can attach to leash, collar, harness, etc.)
  • Extra ID tags (harnesses and collars also have ID attached)
  • Muzzle
  • Poop bags
  • Quick-dry micro fiber towel
  • Waterproof jacket
  • Thundershirt
  • Rescue Remedy (herbal calming drops)
  • Treats
  • Toys

May 14 2011

Guns for Gals

So you want to buy a handgun? I have a hard time recommending just one, but since I get this question all the time, here are some of my favorites.

They may not be perfect for every woman, but they’re a good place to start. These four handgun categories all have a place in a good personal-defense plan, and the specific models can be found chambered for reliable self-defense rounds.

 

Full-Size Semi-Auto Pistol

Smith & Wesson M&P: I like the M&Ps in both full-sized and compact models. They’re simple, ergonomic and come with three different, easily changeable backstraps to customize fit to your hand.

In the full-sized versions, they’re excellent for training, but a tad big for concealment. They offer excellent ammunition capacity, and with the built-in rail for attaching a dedicated light, make great house or car guns.

These are extremely “soft” shooting pistols, and felt recoil across all three chamberings I’ve tried (9 mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP) is insignificant.

 

Read the rest of the article at Shooting Illustrated.


Apr 29 2011

Women’s Concealed Carry Issues

It’s unfortunate, but the fact is that the holster industry tends to give women short shrift when it comes to supplying gear appropriate for their concealment needs. In this Sheriff’s Tip from American Guardian Television, Il Ling and Sheriff Jim Wilson discuss the special issues women face when choosing a concealed carry rig that works for them.


Oct 22 2006

Il Ling New on the Gun Talk Radio Show

Click here to listen to Il Ling’s appearance on Gun Talk with host Tom Gresham<div xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" about="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rschreff/539686762/"><a rel="cc:attributionURL" href= and Tim Wegner CEO of BladeTech.

You can subscribe to the Gun Talk Podcast on iTunes here.