Sep 22 2015

How to Handle Squib Loads and Hangfires

In our last discussion about handguns doing the unexpected, we discussed what some call the “loudest sound you’ll ever hear,” the dreaded “CLICK” when you’re expecting a “BANG.” But what about when your handgun goes “…bang…sort of?”  When something didn’t quite sound, or feel, right? If you hear a lighter-than-normal “bang,” and/or feel lighter-than-normal recoil, it’s possible that a “squib load” may have entered your ammo supply.

Though it’s extremely rare, a squib load/round is one whose propelling energy is less than necessary to push the projectile out of the firearm. This results in your handgun bullet being lodged somewhere between the chamber and the muzzle-a condition that could cause you major problems if you keep shooting. That’s because firing another round behind the squib might result in that following round- and the gases propelling it-getting stuck behind the lodged bullet. Consequences range from a mortally damaged handgun to a very seriously injured shooter.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Handle Squib Loads and Hangfires

 


May 7 2015

How to Properly Fit a Shotgun

how to properly fit a shotgun il ling new

As a shooter and an instructor, nothing pains me more than watching someone get thrown around by his shotgun.  Except, perhaps, being beaten up by my own shotgun.

Why? First, it doesn’t have to happen. Second, it’ll have a negative effect on the shooter’s learning and performance. Third, that just might cause him to walk away from the sport altogether.

The most common reason for this abuse is a poorly fitting shotgun, especially among shooters who are smaller in stature. And by that, I mean pretty much anyone who doesn’t fit the standard or average measurement of a male shooter: approximately 5’10”, 185 pounds. It’s not their fault, and it’s not our fault. Manufacturers have to have some sort of standard to work to–and fortunately for us smaller folk, several are addressing our problem and are creating scaled-down versions of their various firearms.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Properly Fit a Shotgun.


Nov 24 2014

How to Deal With Unsolicited Advice on the Range

how to deal with unsolicited advice on the range il ling new

You know the type. He might be a regular at the gun club, or he’s there with his buddies for a day shoot or maybe he’s by himself zeroing his rifle. He eyes you with your firearm, and as soon as he can get a moment alone with you, he sidles up. “Hey Lil’ Lady…” it starts…and even if he doesn’t say it out loud, you just know he’s thinking it. He tells you why you’re doing whatever you’re doing is wrong. He tells you how to do whatever you’re doing better. He offers to help. If you’re a woman, and you’ve spent any time on the range at all-especially if you’ve been unattended-you’ve probably met the “Hey Little Lady” type.

I’ve been the subject of a “Hey Little Lady” more than a few times. I don’t want to use the word “victim,” because by and large these fellows (almost always men-go figure) mean well, and I always try to take comments in the spirit with which they are delivered. But sometimes it does feel a bit like I’m a target (ouch). After all, I’m just a gal trying to work her guns and technique, thank you…and excuse me, but could you move out of my way? Both physically and figuratively? I’m not saying that my or your way is the only way, but if we’ve spent any time studying these things, we want to have the chance to practice them, too. And we can do it on our own.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Deal With Unsolicited Advice on the Range.


May 14 2014

Tap, Rack, and Roll

The gun didn’t fire. Now what?

Tap, Rack and Roll. The gun didn't fire. Now what? Il Ling New

 

 

 

There you are practicing at the range, committed to your marksmanship basics, peering intently at the front sight as you control your trigger press….anddddd…..CLICK.

How can this be? You’ve done everything right. You’re shooting factory loaded ammunition. Your firearm is squeaky clean and minty fresh.

Get over it. In fact, accept it. As with any mechanical device, things can go wrong with your pistol, and they will. Your acceptance of this will allow you to stay calm and fix the issue to your best ability. Your job is to know which problems you can solve—and how.

Read the rest of the article at NRA Family Insights.


Dec 10 2013

Tips and Tactics: Run the Action

NRA Women presented by Smith & Wesson.

In this week’s Tips and Tactics video, Il Ling New explains why keeping the gun in a firing position while you run the action helps you be ready to take the next shot that much faster.


Oct 4 2013

Going Long Distance

Going for the long shot in Afghanistan. Il Ling New On The Wild Side

For those who have never shot long distances, nestling behind a rifle for 600-yard or longer shot can seem daunting.

With all the hype about long-range shooting these days, a “short-range” shooter might feel a little left out. I’m a die-hard hunter who believes that getting close is as much a part of the hunting experience as is making every shot a clean vital-zone hit.

As a rifle rangemaster at one of the nation’s most popular shooting academies, I’ve seen and heard of my share of excellent shooters and hunters. One that garnered my particular admiration was a sheep hunter who, having gotten his Grand Slam, was working on international species—his and personal goal was to take every one at 200 yards or under. Of course, this could have been an exaggeration, the same as those stories of successful shots at a 500-yard running elk. How refreshing to hear someone speak proudly of hunting—not just shooting—skills.

Yes, I’m a bit of a snob when it comes to hunting. Here I am, decades into my shooting career—as a guide, client, and rifle rangemaster at the nation’s oldest private firearms training facility—and I just took my first shots beyond 500 yards.

Read the rest of the article at American Rifleman.


Sep 19 2013

Tips and Tactics: Maintaining Distance From a Threat

In this week’s Tips & Tactics video, Il Ling New talks about the importance of maintaining your distance from a potential threat, and explains where some of those potential threats could be.

 


Sep 9 2013

Be Better When it Counts: Training Tips for the Budding Defender

Il Ling New demonstrates the proper Weaver stance to her Gunsite students. On The Wild Side

Longtime firearm instructor Il Ling New has provided her top 10 tips on becoming a better marksman.

It’s no secret that, to improve any skill, you’ve got to practice, practice and practice some more. So, if you want to be a better gunfighter, you’ve got to dedicate yourself to practicing with your sidearm—and yes, there’s a right way to go about it. Here are 10 suggestions that can help focus your practice.

1. Learn and understand the safety rules. I recommend the Four Safety Rules. Adhere to them without fail, and be able to do so without fear. This is the foundation of being in control of yourself, and thus, your firearm. With these, you control your situation.

2. Learn how your firearm works—inside and out, backward and forward. You don’t have to learn every part, or every function, but you should understand it well enough to be able to explain the main buttons and levers, and the basic mechanics of how it fires.

3. Get aggressive. Now that you get it—the firearm, that is (see No. 1 and No. 2, above), there’s no reason to be afraid of it in your hands. Yes, there will be some recoil—especially if you need to fire more than once—which is something you always should be prepared for. So get strong on the gun. Understand that your body position can help or hinder your ability to manage it, and learn to use your entire body properly.

4. Focus on the job at hand. As Jeff Cooper used to say, “The purpose of shooting is hitting.” Be in the present (you never knew that yoga and meditation practice would help, did you?). Don’t worry about the noise, don’t think about the recoil. And, to keep your eye properly on your sights, don’t look for the holes! As much as is humanly possible, imagine that target out there is a bad person intent on harming your most beloved. You need to stop it, and you have the power to do it. Apply the mechanics you were taught, and get it done.

5. Take breaks when you want to. Throughout your shooting session, give yourself time to process the mental and physical efforts you’re exerting—these can be considerable if you’re training properly. Don’t be in a rush to finish a sequence or a session.

Read the rest of the tips at American Rifleman

 


May 22 2011

Defensive Team Tactics for Couples

“Any team member, needs to talk to other team members so that they have a plan formulated. I doesn’t have to be a very complex plan–it can be the ‘baby-steps’ of a plan. The important thing is that everybody has a plan, a common plan in mind, and the first steps of that plan in mind, so that they can execute together. And one thing a woman has to keep in mind also is that she does not need to, nor should she, rely completely upon–say–her husband, or her son, or the man of the team to give her direction. She needs to be able to think, and react, and act on whatever information she’s getting, just as much as he does.”

A great segment with Il Ling and Sheriff Jim Wilson from American Guardian TV.


Apr 29 2011

Women’s Concealed Carry Issues

It’s unfortunate, but the fact is that the holster industry tends to give women short shrift when it comes to supplying gear appropriate for their concealment needs. In this Sheriff’s Tip from American Guardian Television, Il Ling and Sheriff Jim Wilson discuss the special issues women face when choosing a concealed carry rig that works for them.