Apr 20 2016

Hunter Training—Gunsite Is Not Just for Personal Defense

Like everything else they do, Gunsite’s Hunter Prep Class is world-class. Mossberg recently hosted a group of writers at Gunsite’s Paulden, AZ facility. There they tested the Mossberg Patriot and worked on their skills during the three-day class with instructor Il Ling New.

Gunsite instructor and professional hunter Il Ling New points out the ideal spot to put the brakes on a charging grizzly.

Gunsite instructor and professional hunter Il Ling New points out the ideal spot to
put the brakes on a charging grizzly.

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Instructor Il Ling New illustrates a proper supported position for fast, accurate shooting in the field.

 

See the rest of this post at Mossberg.com.


Sep 22 2015

How to Handle Squib Loads and Hangfires

In our last discussion about handguns doing the unexpected, we discussed what some call the “loudest sound you’ll ever hear,” the dreaded “CLICK” when you’re expecting a “BANG.” But what about when your handgun goes “…bang…sort of?”  When something didn’t quite sound, or feel, right? If you hear a lighter-than-normal “bang,” and/or feel lighter-than-normal recoil, it’s possible that a “squib load” may have entered your ammo supply.

Though it’s extremely rare, a squib load/round is one whose propelling energy is less than necessary to push the projectile out of the firearm. This results in your handgun bullet being lodged somewhere between the chamber and the muzzle-a condition that could cause you major problems if you keep shooting. That’s because firing another round behind the squib might result in that following round- and the gases propelling it-getting stuck behind the lodged bullet. Consequences range from a mortally damaged handgun to a very seriously injured shooter.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Handle Squib Loads and Hangfires

 


Nov 24 2014

How to Deal With Unsolicited Advice on the Range

how to deal with unsolicited advice on the range il ling new

You know the type. He might be a regular at the gun club, or he’s there with his buddies for a day shoot or maybe he’s by himself zeroing his rifle. He eyes you with your firearm, and as soon as he can get a moment alone with you, he sidles up. “Hey Lil’ Lady…” it starts…and even if he doesn’t say it out loud, you just know he’s thinking it. He tells you why you’re doing whatever you’re doing is wrong. He tells you how to do whatever you’re doing better. He offers to help. If you’re a woman, and you’ve spent any time on the range at all-especially if you’ve been unattended-you’ve probably met the “Hey Little Lady” type.

I’ve been the subject of a “Hey Little Lady” more than a few times. I don’t want to use the word “victim,” because by and large these fellows (almost always men-go figure) mean well, and I always try to take comments in the spirit with which they are delivered. But sometimes it does feel a bit like I’m a target (ouch). After all, I’m just a gal trying to work her guns and technique, thank you…and excuse me, but could you move out of my way? Both physically and figuratively? I’m not saying that my or your way is the only way, but if we’ve spent any time studying these things, we want to have the chance to practice them, too. And we can do it on our own.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Deal With Unsolicited Advice on the Range.


Jun 30 2013

Il Ling New Profiled in NRA Women TV’s ‘New Energy’ Series

See Il Ling’s profile where she reveals the four things her dad told her everybody should learn to do, and how taking stock and following your bliss can make all the difference.

Bonus: Cameo appearance by Il Ling’s Dachshund sidekick Peabody.