Aug 3 2015

Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun

choosing a home defense shotgun Il ling newIt’s been a few years, but shotguns for home defense seem to be making a comeback. It’s not that rifles and handguns won’t work well for home defense, it’s just that shotguns have so much going for them in that realm.

With the array of ammunition available, shotguns can shoot everything from “less-lethal” loads (think rubber bullets, bean bags and others) to snake shot, to buckshot (.30+ caliber projectiles!) to 400-plus grain slugs. While most of us who aren’t in law enforcement or the military will negotiate shorter distances with our defensive shotguns, the scattergun’s versatility does offer the ability to shoot ammo that can address targets at much longer ranges. On the flipside, there is shotgun ammunition that will travel and/or penetrate less, and that might be appropriate for your circumstance. When we add to this the array of accessories also available for them (which isn’t always necessarily a good thing; we’ll touch more on this later), shotguns might be the most versatile home defense firearms you can get.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun.


Apr 24 2015

Five Keys to a Self-Defense Mindset

five keys to a self-defense mindset il ling new

The author on the range.

My college years were spent in a tough, crime-ridden town. During freshman orientation week, a friend a was robbed by what he insisted was “a gang of nine-year-olds!” These young hoodlums somehow managed to take my friend’s bicycle, camera, and wallet. After I stopped laughing I couldn’t help ask how this “gang” managed to ambush him. “Well,” he said, “I was taking some cool photographs of the neighborhood….”

I immediately realized he wasn’t paying attention. Not having situational awareness explains how most people get mugged. When people don’t pay attention to their surroundings, they have no chance to see bad guys coming until it’s too late.

Though psychologists tell us keeping ourselves safe is a basic human instinct, I have found that surviving is something we have to learn how to do. Also, if you chose to carry a gun concealed, you certainly want avoid that worst-case scenario of having to use a gun to defend your life. Actually you have taken on added responsibility to pay attention.

Visit Range365.com for the entirety of Five Keys to a Self-Defense Mindset.

 

 

 

 

 


May 14 2014

Tap, Rack, and Roll

The gun didn’t fire. Now what?

Tap, Rack and Roll. The gun didn't fire. Now what? Il Ling New

 

 

 

There you are practicing at the range, committed to your marksmanship basics, peering intently at the front sight as you control your trigger press….anddddd…..CLICK.

How can this be? You’ve done everything right. You’re shooting factory loaded ammunition. Your firearm is squeaky clean and minty fresh.

Get over it. In fact, accept it. As with any mechanical device, things can go wrong with your pistol, and they will. Your acceptance of this will allow you to stay calm and fix the issue to your best ability. Your job is to know which problems you can solve—and how.

Read the rest of the article at NRA Family Insights.


Mar 31 2014

When You Really Need to Bug Out

Being ready to quickly exit a dangerous situation requires more than having a bag with a few necessities stashed in the closet.

I was comfortably nestled in the pillows with my dog, Peabody, watching TV when the phone rang.

After answering a voice exclaimed, “Il Ling!”

“Yes,” I replied, wondering why the voice sounded so urgent.

“Are you home?”

“Yes.”

“There’s a fire on the road (there’s one main road into my neighborhood) and it’s moving fast….get out now!”

Quickly I understood the urgency, and recognized the voice of our volunteer fire chief.

And with that, I was challenged with a self-defense problem—one that could not be resolved with even the most skilled use of any firearm.

Read the rest of the article at American Rifleman.


Dec 10 2013

Tips and Tactics: Run the Action

NRA Women presented by Smith & Wesson.

In this week’s Tips and Tactics video, Il Ling New explains why keeping the gun in a firing position while you run the action helps you be ready to take the next shot that much faster.


Sep 19 2013

Tips and Tactics: Maintaining Distance From a Threat

In this week’s Tips & Tactics video, Il Ling New talks about the importance of maintaining your distance from a potential threat, and explains where some of those potential threats could be.

 


Sep 9 2013

Be Better When it Counts: Training Tips for the Budding Defender

Il Ling New demonstrates the proper Weaver stance to her Gunsite students. On The Wild Side

Longtime firearm instructor Il Ling New has provided her top 10 tips on becoming a better marksman.

It’s no secret that, to improve any skill, you’ve got to practice, practice and practice some more. So, if you want to be a better gunfighter, you’ve got to dedicate yourself to practicing with your sidearm—and yes, there’s a right way to go about it. Here are 10 suggestions that can help focus your practice.

1. Learn and understand the safety rules. I recommend the Four Safety Rules. Adhere to them without fail, and be able to do so without fear. This is the foundation of being in control of yourself, and thus, your firearm. With these, you control your situation.

2. Learn how your firearm works—inside and out, backward and forward. You don’t have to learn every part, or every function, but you should understand it well enough to be able to explain the main buttons and levers, and the basic mechanics of how it fires.

3. Get aggressive. Now that you get it—the firearm, that is (see No. 1 and No. 2, above), there’s no reason to be afraid of it in your hands. Yes, there will be some recoil—especially if you need to fire more than once—which is something you always should be prepared for. So get strong on the gun. Understand that your body position can help or hinder your ability to manage it, and learn to use your entire body properly.

4. Focus on the job at hand. As Jeff Cooper used to say, “The purpose of shooting is hitting.” Be in the present (you never knew that yoga and meditation practice would help, did you?). Don’t worry about the noise, don’t think about the recoil. And, to keep your eye properly on your sights, don’t look for the holes! As much as is humanly possible, imagine that target out there is a bad person intent on harming your most beloved. You need to stop it, and you have the power to do it. Apply the mechanics you were taught, and get it done.

5. Take breaks when you want to. Throughout your shooting session, give yourself time to process the mental and physical efforts you’re exerting—these can be considerable if you’re training properly. Don’t be in a rush to finish a sequence or a session.

Read the rest of the tips at American Rifleman

 


Aug 15 2013

Tips and Tactics: Hunting Safety

Whether you consider yourself an expert hunter or this hunting season will be your first, it’s always important to review safety rules. Il Ling New reviews hunter safety in this week’s Tips & Tactics video.