Nov 26 2013

The Bugout Kit

Peabody on Il Ling's Bugout Kit, Ready to Go On The Wild SideSome of you have asked about my bugout gear, so I’ll tell you what MY packs have — everybody’s kit will be different, but should have the basics. Mine weighs more than the recommended “25% of your body weight” — it comes in at just under 50 pounds. But I’ve made sure I can lift, stand, and hike with it if I have to. The cool thing is there is a smaller backpack that zips off the front of the large pack. I’ve loaded what I consider to be the most critical items in it, so I’m still ready if I only have room/energy for the smaller pack. This photo gives you an idea of size: Peabody is a 11 pound mini-dachshund.

(I use ziplocks and/or space saver bags — both to protect stuff, but also to have the bags available.)

This list is NOT in order of importance!

Small (Critical Items) Pack:

  • Water filtration system+steel cup+collapsible water bottle
  • Fire starter+candles
  • Disposable towels
  • Head lamp+ batteries
  • Comprehensive first aid kit ( also includes trauma stuff, rubbing alcohol, saline, dental floss for sutures, etc.)
  • Duct tape, paracord, zip ties
  • Garbage bags
  • STORM whistle
  • Fixed blade knife
  • Multitool
  • Permanent marker
  • Socks
  • Fleece stocking cap
  • Non-battery flashlight
  • Clothes (including waterproof stuff)
  • Saw
  • Neoprene gloves
  • Nitrile gloves (also in first aid kit)
  • Alcohol wipes (also in first aid kit)
  • Orange safety vest
  • Orange surveyor’s tape
  • Orange bandana
  • Survival suit
  • Space blanket
  • Strobing blinker
  • Breathing mask (dust, etc.)
  • Copies of passport, etc.

(Personal defense tools go on my person)

Bugout Gear: In the larger pack (which, again, zips to the smaller)

  • Tent
  • Sleeping bag
  • Extra clothing
  • Quick-dry microfiber towel
  • Permanent marker
  • 5-hour energy
  • Large garbage bags (the dark, thick ones)
  • Water proof pads – can be used together as tarp, or individually to carry, wrap, funnel, etc.
  • Tissues
  • Toothbrush/toothpaste
  • Emergency poncho
  • Baby wipes
  • Additional first aid supplies (to supplement those in small pack)
  • Extra shoes
  • Playing cards (aside from obvious use, can also be used for paper, etc.)

And of course,
Peabody’s Pack — which goes into a dog carrier, just in case we need that for transport, etc. (ditto the muzzle):

  • Food
  • Stainless food and water bowls
  • First aid kit (I put it together just for dog stuff)
  • Extra copies of rabies, etc.
  • Extra leash
  • Extra collars, including lighted collar
  • Extra harness
  • Blinker (can attach to leash, collar, harness, etc.)
  • Extra ID tags (harnesses and collars also have ID attached)
  • Muzzle
  • Poop bags
  • Quick-dry micro fiber towel
  • Waterproof jacket
  • Thundershirt
  • Rescue Remedy (herbal calming drops)
  • Treats
  • Toys

May 14 2011

Guns for Gals

So you want to buy a handgun? I have a hard time recommending just one, but since I get this question all the time, here are some of my favorites.

They may not be perfect for every woman, but they’re a good place to start. These four handgun categories all have a place in a good personal-defense plan, and the specific models can be found chambered for reliable self-defense rounds.

 

Full-Size Semi-Auto Pistol

Smith & Wesson M&P: I like the M&Ps in both full-sized and compact models. They’re simple, ergonomic and come with three different, easily changeable backstraps to customize fit to your hand.

In the full-sized versions, they’re excellent for training, but a tad big for concealment. They offer excellent ammunition capacity, and with the built-in rail for attaching a dedicated light, make great house or car guns.

These are extremely “soft” shooting pistols, and felt recoil across all three chamberings I’ve tried (9 mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP) is insignificant.

 

Read the rest of the article at Shooting Illustrated.


Apr 29 2011

Women’s Concealed Carry Issues

It’s unfortunate, but the fact is that the holster industry tends to give women short shrift when it comes to supplying gear appropriate for their concealment needs. In this Sheriff’s Tip from American Guardian Television, Il Ling and Sheriff Jim Wilson discuss the special issues women face when choosing a concealed carry rig that works for them.