Apr 20 2016

Hunter Training—Gunsite Is Not Just for Personal Defense

Like everything else they do, Gunsite’s Hunter Prep Class is world-class. Mossberg recently hosted a group of writers at Gunsite’s Paulden, AZ facility. There they tested the Mossberg Patriot and worked on their skills during the three-day class with instructor Il Ling New.

Gunsite instructor and professional hunter Il Ling New points out the ideal spot to put the brakes on a charging grizzly.

Gunsite instructor and professional hunter Il Ling New points out the ideal spot to
put the brakes on a charging grizzly.

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Instructor Il Ling New illustrates a proper supported position for fast, accurate shooting in the field.

 

See the rest of this post at Mossberg.com.


Apr 5 2016

Hunter Training at Gunsite

Many people are aware of the law enforcement and tactical training that Gunsite Academy is known for…but they also cater to hunters seeking to hone their skills. In this video, Gunsite instructor Il Ling New discusses some of the skills and features of this interesting course.

This video was originally posted at Safari Club International.


Aug 3 2015

Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun

choosing a home defense shotgun Il ling newIt’s been a few years, but shotguns for home defense seem to be making a comeback. It’s not that rifles and handguns won’t work well for home defense, it’s just that shotguns have so much going for them in that realm.

With the array of ammunition available, shotguns can shoot everything from “less-lethal” loads (think rubber bullets, bean bags and others) to snake shot, to buckshot (.30+ caliber projectiles!) to 400-plus grain slugs. While most of us who aren’t in law enforcement or the military will negotiate shorter distances with our defensive shotguns, the scattergun’s versatility does offer the ability to shoot ammo that can address targets at much longer ranges. On the flipside, there is shotgun ammunition that will travel and/or penetrate less, and that might be appropriate for your circumstance. When we add to this the array of accessories also available for them (which isn’t always necessarily a good thing; we’ll touch more on this later), shotguns might be the most versatile home defense firearms you can get.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun.


May 7 2015

How to Properly Fit a Shotgun

how to properly fit a shotgun il ling new

As a shooter and an instructor, nothing pains me more than watching someone get thrown around by his shotgun.  Except, perhaps, being beaten up by my own shotgun.

Why? First, it doesn’t have to happen. Second, it’ll have a negative effect on the shooter’s learning and performance. Third, that just might cause him to walk away from the sport altogether.

The most common reason for this abuse is a poorly fitting shotgun, especially among shooters who are smaller in stature. And by that, I mean pretty much anyone who doesn’t fit the standard or average measurement of a male shooter: approximately 5’10”, 185 pounds. It’s not their fault, and it’s not our fault. Manufacturers have to have some sort of standard to work to–and fortunately for us smaller folk, several are addressing our problem and are creating scaled-down versions of their various firearms.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Properly Fit a Shotgun.


Sep 9 2013

Be Better When it Counts: Training Tips for the Budding Defender

Il Ling New demonstrates the proper Weaver stance to her Gunsite students. On The Wild Side

Longtime firearm instructor Il Ling New has provided her top 10 tips on becoming a better marksman.

It’s no secret that, to improve any skill, you’ve got to practice, practice and practice some more. So, if you want to be a better gunfighter, you’ve got to dedicate yourself to practicing with your sidearm—and yes, there’s a right way to go about it. Here are 10 suggestions that can help focus your practice.

1. Learn and understand the safety rules. I recommend the Four Safety Rules. Adhere to them without fail, and be able to do so without fear. This is the foundation of being in control of yourself, and thus, your firearm. With these, you control your situation.

2. Learn how your firearm works—inside and out, backward and forward. You don’t have to learn every part, or every function, but you should understand it well enough to be able to explain the main buttons and levers, and the basic mechanics of how it fires.

3. Get aggressive. Now that you get it—the firearm, that is (see No. 1 and No. 2, above), there’s no reason to be afraid of it in your hands. Yes, there will be some recoil—especially if you need to fire more than once—which is something you always should be prepared for. So get strong on the gun. Understand that your body position can help or hinder your ability to manage it, and learn to use your entire body properly.

4. Focus on the job at hand. As Jeff Cooper used to say, “The purpose of shooting is hitting.” Be in the present (you never knew that yoga and meditation practice would help, did you?). Don’t worry about the noise, don’t think about the recoil. And, to keep your eye properly on your sights, don’t look for the holes! As much as is humanly possible, imagine that target out there is a bad person intent on harming your most beloved. You need to stop it, and you have the power to do it. Apply the mechanics you were taught, and get it done.

5. Take breaks when you want to. Throughout your shooting session, give yourself time to process the mental and physical efforts you’re exerting—these can be considerable if you’re training properly. Don’t be in a rush to finish a sequence or a session.

Read the rest of the tips at American Rifleman

 


Aug 25 2010

Beginning Shooting Tips with Il Ling New: Loading & Unloading

This is the ninth in a series of instructional videos for Ruger Firearms. Check back for more episodes!


Aug 2 2010

Beginning Shooting Tips with Il Ling New: Aiming

This is the eighth in a series of instructional videos for Ruger Firearms. Check back for more episodes!