Apr 20 2016

Hunter Training—Gunsite Is Not Just for Personal Defense

Like everything else they do, Gunsite’s Hunter Prep Class is world-class. Mossberg recently hosted a group of writers at Gunsite’s Paulden, AZ facility. There they tested the Mossberg Patriot and worked on their skills during the three-day class with instructor Il Ling New.

Gunsite instructor and professional hunter Il Ling New points out the ideal spot to put the brakes on a charging grizzly.

Gunsite instructor and professional hunter Il Ling New points out the ideal spot to
put the brakes on a charging grizzly.

Il-Ling-New-Kneeling-1920x1280

Instructor Il Ling New illustrates a proper supported position for fast, accurate shooting in the field.

 

See the rest of this post at Mossberg.com.


Apr 5 2016

Hunter Training at Gunsite

Many people are aware of the law enforcement and tactical training that Gunsite Academy is known for…but they also cater to hunters seeking to hone their skills. In this video, Gunsite instructor Il Ling New discusses some of the skills and features of this interesting course.

This video was originally posted at Safari Club International.


Sep 22 2015

How to Handle Squib Loads and Hangfires

In our last discussion about handguns doing the unexpected, we discussed what some call the “loudest sound you’ll ever hear,” the dreaded “CLICK” when you’re expecting a “BANG.” But what about when your handgun goes “…bang…sort of?”  When something didn’t quite sound, or feel, right? If you hear a lighter-than-normal “bang,” and/or feel lighter-than-normal recoil, it’s possible that a “squib load” may have entered your ammo supply.

Though it’s extremely rare, a squib load/round is one whose propelling energy is less than necessary to push the projectile out of the firearm. This results in your handgun bullet being lodged somewhere between the chamber and the muzzle-a condition that could cause you major problems if you keep shooting. That’s because firing another round behind the squib might result in that following round- and the gases propelling it-getting stuck behind the lodged bullet. Consequences range from a mortally damaged handgun to a very seriously injured shooter.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Handle Squib Loads and Hangfires

 


Aug 3 2015

Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun

choosing a home defense shotgun Il ling newIt’s been a few years, but shotguns for home defense seem to be making a comeback. It’s not that rifles and handguns won’t work well for home defense, it’s just that shotguns have so much going for them in that realm.

With the array of ammunition available, shotguns can shoot everything from “less-lethal” loads (think rubber bullets, bean bags and others) to snake shot, to buckshot (.30+ caliber projectiles!) to 400-plus grain slugs. While most of us who aren’t in law enforcement or the military will negotiate shorter distances with our defensive shotguns, the scattergun’s versatility does offer the ability to shoot ammo that can address targets at much longer ranges. On the flipside, there is shotgun ammunition that will travel and/or penetrate less, and that might be appropriate for your circumstance. When we add to this the array of accessories also available for them (which isn’t always necessarily a good thing; we’ll touch more on this later), shotguns might be the most versatile home defense firearms you can get.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun.


May 7 2015

How to Properly Fit a Shotgun

how to properly fit a shotgun il ling new

As a shooter and an instructor, nothing pains me more than watching someone get thrown around by his shotgun.  Except, perhaps, being beaten up by my own shotgun.

Why? First, it doesn’t have to happen. Second, it’ll have a negative effect on the shooter’s learning and performance. Third, that just might cause him to walk away from the sport altogether.

The most common reason for this abuse is a poorly fitting shotgun, especially among shooters who are smaller in stature. And by that, I mean pretty much anyone who doesn’t fit the standard or average measurement of a male shooter: approximately 5’10”, 185 pounds. It’s not their fault, and it’s not our fault. Manufacturers have to have some sort of standard to work to–and fortunately for us smaller folk, several are addressing our problem and are creating scaled-down versions of their various firearms.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Properly Fit a Shotgun.


Apr 24 2015

Five Keys to a Self-Defense Mindset

five keys to a self-defense mindset il ling new

The author on the range.

My college years were spent in a tough, crime-ridden town. During freshman orientation week, a friend a was robbed by what he insisted was “a gang of nine-year-olds!” These young hoodlums somehow managed to take my friend’s bicycle, camera, and wallet. After I stopped laughing I couldn’t help ask how this “gang” managed to ambush him. “Well,” he said, “I was taking some cool photographs of the neighborhood….”

I immediately realized he wasn’t paying attention. Not having situational awareness explains how most people get mugged. When people don’t pay attention to their surroundings, they have no chance to see bad guys coming until it’s too late.

Though psychologists tell us keeping ourselves safe is a basic human instinct, I have found that surviving is something we have to learn how to do. Also, if you chose to carry a gun concealed, you certainly want avoid that worst-case scenario of having to use a gun to defend your life. Actually you have taken on added responsibility to pay attention.

Visit Range365.com for the entirety of Five Keys to a Self-Defense Mindset.

 

 

 

 

 


Nov 24 2014

How to Deal With Unsolicited Advice on the Range

how to deal with unsolicited advice on the range il ling new

You know the type. He might be a regular at the gun club, or he’s there with his buddies for a day shoot or maybe he’s by himself zeroing his rifle. He eyes you with your firearm, and as soon as he can get a moment alone with you, he sidles up. “Hey Lil’ Lady…” it starts…and even if he doesn’t say it out loud, you just know he’s thinking it. He tells you why you’re doing whatever you’re doing is wrong. He tells you how to do whatever you’re doing better. He offers to help. If you’re a woman, and you’ve spent any time on the range at all-especially if you’ve been unattended-you’ve probably met the “Hey Little Lady” type.

I’ve been the subject of a “Hey Little Lady” more than a few times. I don’t want to use the word “victim,” because by and large these fellows (almost always men-go figure) mean well, and I always try to take comments in the spirit with which they are delivered. But sometimes it does feel a bit like I’m a target (ouch). After all, I’m just a gal trying to work her guns and technique, thank you…and excuse me, but could you move out of my way? Both physically and figuratively? I’m not saying that my or your way is the only way, but if we’ve spent any time studying these things, we want to have the chance to practice them, too. And we can do it on our own.

Visit NRA Family for the entirety of How to Deal With Unsolicited Advice on the Range.


May 14 2014

Tap, Rack, and Roll

The gun didn’t fire. Now what?

Tap, Rack and Roll. The gun didn't fire. Now what? Il Ling New

 

 

 

There you are practicing at the range, committed to your marksmanship basics, peering intently at the front sight as you control your trigger press….anddddd…..CLICK.

How can this be? You’ve done everything right. You’re shooting factory loaded ammunition. Your firearm is squeaky clean and minty fresh.

Get over it. In fact, accept it. As with any mechanical device, things can go wrong with your pistol, and they will. Your acceptance of this will allow you to stay calm and fix the issue to your best ability. Your job is to know which problems you can solve—and how.

Read the rest of the article at NRA Family Insights.


Mar 31 2014

When You Really Need to Bug Out

Being ready to quickly exit a dangerous situation requires more than having a bag with a few necessities stashed in the closet.

I was comfortably nestled in the pillows with my dog, Peabody, watching TV when the phone rang.

After answering a voice exclaimed, “Il Ling!”

“Yes,” I replied, wondering why the voice sounded so urgent.

“Are you home?”

“Yes.”

“There’s a fire on the road (there’s one main road into my neighborhood) and it’s moving fast….get out now!”

Quickly I understood the urgency, and recognized the voice of our volunteer fire chief.

And with that, I was challenged with a self-defense problem—one that could not be resolved with even the most skilled use of any firearm.

Read the rest of the article at American Rifleman.


Dec 10 2013

Tips and Tactics: Run the Action

NRA Women presented by Smith & Wesson.

In this week’s Tips and Tactics video, Il Ling New explains why keeping the gun in a firing position while you run the action helps you be ready to take the next shot that much faster.